Category: Aviation History

Posts related to Aviation History

T-38 Blog Post 2
Air Force flight training was arranged around three phases, primary flight in the Cessna T-41 (Cessna 172), the Cessna T-37, and the Northrop T-38 Talon. I survived—actually passed—the first two phases. Six months before graduation, we transitioned to the T-38.The T-38, or “White Rocket” as some called it, was an entirely new flying experience. The T-38 is a tandem two-seat, twin-jet, advanced “fast-jet” (supersonic) trainer with a top speed of 1.3 Mach (speed of sound) and maximum G-load of plus 9.0, i.e., the airframe could withstand load forces equal to nine times the force of gravity.The T-38, or “White Rocket” as some called it, was an entirely new flying experience. The T-38 is a tandem two-seat, twin-jet, advanced “fast-jet” (supersonic) trainer with a top speed of 1.3 Mach (speed of sound) and maximum G-load of plus 9.0, i.e., the airframe could withstand load forces equal to nine times the force of gravity.
2019 Mooney Ovation Ultra 5
Let’s face it, being in the aircraft manufacturing business is not always smooth flying! It seems however, Mooney Aircraft has had more than it’s share of ownership changes, bankruptcies, and market downturns to drive away all but the most determined entrepreneurs. Its success is a testament to the aircraft—a design that has captured the imaginations—and pocketbooks—of a special class of aviators. Aviators seeking a fast, comfortable, and distinctive aircraft.
Picture4
In February 1970, after completing Officer Training School, I was commissioned as an Air Force officer and transferred to Reese Air Force Base (AFB) Lubbock, Texas for a year of what was described as intense Undergraduate Pilot Training (UPT), i.e., flight training. UPT comprised three phases—primary flight, initial jet training, and advanced jet training. The primary flight instruction was in a military Cessna 172, designated the T-41. I had enough prior flight experience that I completed this phase easily. During initial jet training, we attended classes on basic aerodynamics and the safety systems of the T-37—the next aircraft in the training syllabus. The safety courses included ejection seat operation and parachute landing fall training.
SE-5E-Cockpit
True instrument flight, i.e., safe flight solely by references to the aircraft instruments lagged behind the development of aircraft by several decades. In reality, there was only one prudent choice—fly only when visibility allowed the pilot to see a horizon. A World War I Army pilot, William Charles Ocker—“the father of blind flying’—nearly died in 1918 while testing an early Sperry turn indicator. He ended up in a steep spiral and only narrowly escaped when he broke out of the clouds with room to recover.