Picture4
In February 1970, after completing Officer Training School, I was commissioned as an Air Force officer and transferred to Reese Air Force Base (AFB) Lubbock, Texas for a year of what was described as intense Undergraduate Pilot Training (UPT), i.e., flight training. UPT comprised three phases—primary flight, initial jet training, and advanced jet training. The primary flight instruction was in a military Cessna 172, designated the T-41. I had enough prior flight experience that I completed this phase easily. During initial jet training, we attended classes on basic aerodynamics and the safety systems of the T-37—the next aircraft in the training syllabus. The safety courses included ejection seat operation and parachute landing fall training.
6 Seat Singles
So, you have outgrown your 4-seat aircraft. More kids, more friends, more stuff—the time has come to look at something larger with six seats. And you are still cost conscious or just have not upgraded to a multi-engine rating. There are four practical candidates in the six-seat single engine market that may provide the solution you are looking for—each with enough individual features to give you real choices. The six-seat class includes the Cessna 206, Piper Six, Beechcraft A36, and the Piper Malibu.
Occupied Lav
I flunked Christmas bidding this year. As Len Morgan says from Flying Magazine, “Anyone can fly a trip—but it takes a genius to bid them!” I think he’s right.  I have no idea what happened. All I know is that with almost 30 years of seniority at my airline, I was unable to “hold” Christmas off and as I write this, I’m on day 3 of a 4 day trip that began Christmas day.  Sigh. Nonetheless, there’s still been times this month where I’ve been able to be with friends and loved ones and celebrate what Christmas is about.  In those settings, maybe because of the novelty of being an airline pilot and certain perceptions about my livelihood,  non-fliers will often ask:  “Have you had any close calls?”
USAF C-140
In the 1950s, the Air Force discussed the need for a small utility jet. Lockheed built the prototype JetStar in anticipation of the formal request for proposal, but the request was never issued. Lockheed decided to continue development and promote the JetStar as a business aircraft.A product of Kelly Johnson’s Skunk Works division, the JetStar (Lockheed designation L-1329 and L-329) went from concept to a flying prototype in 241 days. The JetStar’s first flight was in September 1957 and production aircraft entered service in 1961—just one year ahead of the smaller North American Sabreliner (first flight Sept 1958). The registration number of the first aircraft was N329J—the “J” was for Kelly Johnson.
C130-Front
Sitting around the hangar, or hanging at “Hotdog day,” or congregating wherever pilots like to congregate, that dumb joke will always bring smiles…except for me…It’s not as funny since August 19, 1985.It was a beautiful morning as the other student and I met with our Air Force Instructor Pilot (IP) at the Squadron Ops desk to discuss the morning’s training sortie. It was a Monday morning and at “oh-dark-thirty,” after talking about our weekends, we were looking over the clipboards with the tele-typed weather reports of various airports around the surrounding area and discussed where we would go on our third flight in the glorious, Vietnam era, C-130.